About your Search

20130117
20130117
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
-term debt ceiling increase, pass that through the house with spending cuts, deal with the other elements of government spending and then set up a protracted argument or debate over the debt ceiling going forward. as republicans say, when it comes to their strategy, cutting spending is imperative. melissa: there's no celebration the fact we're a nation of $16 trillion in debt and you have someone in the white house that says to do the one thing that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever, and that is raise the debt ceiling with no change in the future? that is actually an absurd argument i don't think any householder in a state run well operates like that. >> house budget committee chairman spoke to reporters a short while ago saying this to work in the strategies on all this trying to identify the spending cuts that they want to include any increase in the debt ceiling. also says despite what some pessimist might say, house republicans still plan to pursue tax reform this year in the house. whew. melissa: it'll be interesting to see the hold up on anything real on the spending cuts side. t
budget. >> a continuing resolution will be passed. the debt ceiling will be raised, right. >> i agree. the debt limit should be raised. >> should be raised with spending cuts and policy changes. >> why. >> so we can put our nation on a path to balance. >> why not have the fight on resolution. you're talking about future spending and not threatening the full faith and credit of the u.s. government. >> nobody is threatening the full faith and credit. >> it undermines your argument to have it during the debt ceiling debate. >> we can have this debate right now. we need it for the next month and come together a month from now and figure out where we stand. to prejudge this debate and say the president won't do x, the president won't accept cuts before we go the american people and say it's unreasonable to have a president of the united states who doesn't think we have to have spending cuts. >> i would be advising the president the same thing. look out to congress you guys send me a bill to raise the debt ceiling. >> you would be advising the president. >> use the spending sequester. it's
, from the fiscal cliff, this issue, we have continuing resolutions, the debt ceiling debate. he's in full campaign mode. do you think the president emboldened by reelection and maybe emboldened by a win on the fiscal cliff, do you think he's overreaching on the political consequences and how should republicans deal with it? >> look, i think he clearly felt after the election that he was out to crush the one institution that was stopping his agenda, that it stopped it in the second, in the third and the fourth years of his administration, first administration, namely the republican house. he set up the fiscal cliff negotiations deliberately to split the republicans in the house, knowing that if he did, it would neuter the opposition and he would have the kind of dominance of washington, which he had in the first two years before he lost the house in the mid term elections. so, i have no doubt that that's how he used the fiscal cliff. that's how he's going to use the issue of immigration and that's how he's going to approach the debt ceiling and other issues and it's his objective
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)